Setting the Opening View in a PDF

Editor’s Note:
The following is excerpted, published with the expressed permission of the author and publisher, from an introductory chapter of ‘Adobe Acrobat 6: Complete Course‘ book.

When you first opened the PDF after distilling it in Acrobat Distiller, the PDF page opened in a Fit Width view. Only a portion of the document page was displayed in the Document pane. You can establish the opening view of a PDF file and determine which zoom view the file will be displayed in when it’s opened. Before saving a PDF as a final file, you’ll often want to establish the opening view. In this segment, you learn how to control the page view when an Acrobat viewer opens a PDF.

  1. Download cb_annualReport_wm_comment.pdf [PDF: 0.8 MB]
  2. Open cb_annualReport_wm_comment.pdf in Acrobat
  3. Choose File > Document Properties.

    The Document Properties dialog box opens.

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  1. Click Initial View in the left pane.
  2. Open the Page Layout pull-down menu by clicking the down-pointing arrow. Choose Single Page.
  3. Open the Magnification pull-down menu and choose Fit Page.
  4. Click the OK button.

    Each time a user opens the file, the initial view opens the document in a single page layout view and fits the page completely in the Document pane. The changes you make in initial view take place only after you save the file.

  5. Choose File > Save As and save the file to the tutorial folder. Click Yes when an alert dialog box opens.

    When you choose File > Save As and save a file to the same folder using the same filename, Acrobat opens a dialog box informing you a file with the same name already exists in the target folder. It asks whether you want to replace the file. When you choose yes, you completely rewrite a file. By rewriting a file after several edits, the file is optimized and the result is a more efficient document with a smaller file size. As a matter of practice, always rewrite a file as your last editing step.

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About the Author: Ted Padova

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